Brighton at the mouth of the Fox River

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Brighton at the mouth of the Fox River.

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the town of Brighton at the mouth of the Fox River.  In October 1867, Brighton, 11 to 12 miles south of Charleston, later officially renamed Tiromoana, had a population of 6,000, the township was on a slim strip of sand formed at the mouth of the Fox River, between the coast range and the breakers, 160 buildings (including 53 hotels), a lock-up and a courthouse, dance halls complete with dance hostesses bought over from Melbourne.  In 1868 about 14,340 ounces of gold valued at £58,038 was exported from Brighton, at one time there were 17 constables stationed at Brighton, and it was not unusual for the more fortunate miners to clear up to £70 per week, before the supply of gold ran out.  Brighton was the first pilot station in the Buller District and also had the first horticulturists, THIEL (a German), ROSANOWSKI (a Bohemian), and James MOLES (an Englishman), set up as nurserymen and the first English trees in the Buller were planted along a bend of the Fox River.  Eventually the sea reclaimed the entire township.

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Brighton at the mouth of the Fox River by Trich Devescovi is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License