Topic: Lieutenant Colonel A. Winter-Evans, Service No. 26/11

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Lieutenant Colonel A. Winter-Evans, Service No. 26/11 was a Manager for the Consolidated Goldfields at Reefton, New Zealand. He left New Zealand with the 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade Rifle Brigade. His next of kin was listed as his wife Mrs A. Winter-Evans of Reefton.

Lieutenant Colonel A. Winter-Evans, Service No. 26/11 was a Manager for the Consolidated Goldfields at Reefton, New Zealand. He left New Zealand with the 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade Rifle Brigade. His next of kin was listed as his wife Mrs A. Winter-Evans of Reefton.

 Prior to joining the Expeditionary Force, he held a commission in the Motor Service Corps. He was awarded the D.S.O., for gallantry at Messines. Lieutenant Colonel Winter-Evans was killed in action on 12 October 1917 at Passchendale, Ypres, Belgium at the age of 35. He was the elder son of Colonel Robert W. Evans and of Mrs Evans, of Durban, Natal and husband of Edith Louise Evans,  nee Foster

 The 3rd Battalion mourned the loss of their commander. A quote from Austin - NZRB Official History pg 247.. states “ at Passchendaele, as soon as it appeared that the check was more than temporary he had gone ahead to endevour by direct personal efforts to get his troops forward, but moving from shell-hole to shell-hole amongst the scattered groups, he drew upon himself the inevitable burst of machine gun fire, under which, fearlessly persisting, he at last fell mortally wounded" .  Winter-Evans along with Lt.Col G.A King were the highest ranking New Zealand officers to die that day (New Zealand's bloodiest) where 845 men were killed during just four hours.

Prior to going to war Winter Evans was a manager for Consolidated Gold Fields of New Zealand Ltd - which operated a number of gold mines in the Reefton area of the West Coast of the South Island of New Zealand. During a turbulent period in the history of the Reefton gold mines in 1912 Evans led the company in a bitterly fought six month strike - at the end of which he introduced new work practices which improved productivity substantially which ensured the mines continued to operate over the next two decades when inflation increased prices in NZ by some 67 percent.

 Born in Natal, he was the elder son of the late Colonel Robert Winter Evans. He was recommended for the Victoria Cross while a teenager serving in the Boer War for his native South Africa. He was awarded the D.C.M. After the Boer war he went to New York where he attended Columbia School of Mines (he is listed on Columbia Universitys honours board) . He married Edith Louise Foster of Limpsfield Surrey and had two children.

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Lieutenant Colonel A. Winter-Evans, Service No. 26/11


First Names:Alfred
Last Name:Winter-Evans
Place of Birth:South Africa